About Us


Who We Are

The Disciples of Dirt Mountain Bike Club (DOD) boasts members from all over the Pacific Northwest and beyond, but we focus our efforts within Oregon's Southern Willamette Valley, where the club was founded and the majority of our membership live and ride. We have approximately 150 active members/participants. Club members share a high level of passion for mountain biking and the DOD is well known within the cycling world for being stewards of our local trails and champions for improved trail access for cyclists.

Bottom line: we are an organization of dirt worshiping mountain bike riders of all ages and abilities. We tend towards trail maintenance and any excuse to get dirty and just enjoy our time ... on bikes.

 

Trail Stewardship

The Disciples of Dirt annually log thousands of volunteer hours to build and maintain trails. A typical year for the DOD has us putting in over 1,000 hours of trail maintenance work on local Bureau of Land Management (BLM) trails near Lorane. We have built a network of approximately twenty miles of trails and work hard to maintain these trails for the use of local hikers, mushroom pickers and trail runners, in addition to mountain bikers. We have also established a working relationship with the US Army Corps of Engineers and have logged several hundred hours of maintenance work on the North Shore trail at Lookout Point Reservoir outside of Lowell, OR. 

Perhaps the DOD is best known for our stewardship of the trails in the Oakridge area. Oakridge is a well known mountain bike destination that attracts riders from throughout the US and we believe it is due in no small part to our efforts and collaboration with a variety of organizations to build, maintain and often improve the trails. Over the past 25 years, we have put tens of thousands of hours into the maintenance of trails in the Middle Fork Ranger District of the Willamette National Forest and have developed valuable partnerships with USFS staff and with other local trail user groups. We also spent hundreds of hours working on trails in the McKenzie River Ranger District of the Willamette National Forest and the Cottage Grove Ranger District of the Umpqua National Forest.

 

Where We Are Headed

As the challenges and needs of local mountain bikers change, the DOD is able and willing to meet those needs and challenges. One new challenge we are now taking on is the growth and expansion of readily available urban single track. As our sport grows, it only makes sense to have close-in riding options on genuine mountain bike trails, and the DOD has taken the lead in forming relationships and creating opportunities toward this end. We have a great future in Lane County, and great riding in Eugene and Springfield is going to be a part of that. One partnership … one swing of the trail tool … one sweet piece of trail at a time!

 

        

 



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